There was a time when music mattered.

A time before the desire for high profit margins replaced innovation and creativity with manufactured noise and good marketing. A time before big business took hold and squeezed the soul out of it. A time before dress codes excluded people certain establishments decided didn’t look ‘right’. A time when it wasn’t the venue that mattered but the people filling it.

Tomorrow (10 December), in a disused warehouse on Jordan Street, BOSS magazine and The
Tea Street Band along with Waxxx DJ’s and Sound City are taking you back. Back to the time the
music mattered. Back to the phuture…

Well, that’s what it says here – and who are we to doubt? BOSS mag – an unusually offbeat footy fanzine dedicated to all things red – says it is tired of the music scene, both nationally and locally, and is kicking back against high ticket prices for music events.

The organisers say that rave culture was a scene that did not discriminate on any basis, least of all economic, so Phuture Liverpool – Sounds of the State 1988 will be a celebration of that culture and music.

As a result expect to see Andy Carroll taking Liverpool back to a field in 1988, alongside Chibuku’s James Rand and Waxxx DJ’s. The Tea Street band will also be launching their first single.

Oh, and it’s in a disused warehouse – how’s that for verisimilitude?

Phuture Liverpool – Sounds of The State ‘88
9pm til late, 10 December
Disused Warehouse, 59 Jordan Street
Tickets £5 / £7 on the door or from www.distantecho.co.uk, www.ticketweb.co.uk, Probe Records and 3Beat Records

  • worldsofpaul

    i remember walking into the state in the late eighties , hearing ‘vooday ray’ for the first time and my jaw literally dropping.