After recent venue closures in the city, there’s an even greater need to support our local spaces.

Static Gallery today revealed on Facebook they’d been hit with a Noise Abatement Notice – by someone who’s recently moved into Roscoe Lane. Right next to Static.

Although the venue are formally appealing the notice, the space, which houses gigs, clubnights and exhibitions as well as being home to design and creative studios, confirmed all future events will go ahead. But they’ll be keeping a close eye on the decibel levels.

Noise has been a constant issue in the city in recent years – the Chameleon bar was subject to various complaints, and Base2Stay also had to comply with noise regulations (by having room windows that, er, don’t actually open).

To look at the issue in greater depth, early next year Static Gallery are hosting a debate on the issue of noise in the city centre. Just what does it mean to be a 21st century city, with venues and housing cropping up side by side?

Static confirm they’ll be “inviting a series of informed speakers who are from both sides of the noise divide and a series of cultural commentators and urbanists”. It looks like it’ll be a particularly interesting – and passionate – event.

Details on the debate, and how to get involved, will be posted on Static Gallery’s Facebook page, or contact paul@statictrading.com for more info. We’ll bring you the details once we know more.

  • Doc_Daneeka

    Sorry, This happens far too often. If you move into the city centre then you don’t get to complain about city centre noises. Didn’t this happen to The Raz as well been there for ever and then some new resident complains about the noise.

    Frankly I think all the venues in the city should just identify whose complained and bar the buggers then they can enjoy ‘city centre’ live sat in their souless little boxes on their own.

  • http://www.sevenstreets.com/ SevenStreets

    The Raz seemed to have endless issues with their smoking terrace, which backed onto housing.

  • Kara Byers

    Oh, the irony of this in a city that’s famed for its music and creativity. Its noisy music and creativity

  • Ema Quinn

    noise can be a difficult issue, though I do feel that if you choose to live in a city centre you just have to deal with it. I hate living in noisey places, once i’m home I need my peace and quiet, I lived in the city centre for years, when it got too much I moved – I think the resident has the prdominent rights to quiet in residential areas and I’d fight tooth and nail for that, but in the centre of a cultural city, sorry folks like it or leave!

  • David Yates

    theres a whole citys worth of suburbs for this woman to live in. and the wirral. noise in residential areas is unacceptable, but town is town…

  • Jamie Jenkin

    IF ONLY we could think of somewhere for people to live that wasn’t next door to music venues. And IF ONLY those venues that have music on had the DECENCY to not be established for years in the first place. And IF ONLY there was some way to find out about the local area before moving house.

  • Chris Gibson

    Make more noise I say!

  • jimmo

    I live on Knight Street (going up towards the Georgian Quarter), which is a back street away from the Ropewalks district, and in fairness the gallery is really loud sometimes… I know some noise is to be expected in the city centre, but over places seem to be more insulated..THey shouldn’t have to close though, maybe they should soundproof?Jim

  • othersideofthestory

    This article has misrepresented recent events. For a debate to be democratic and worthy of its name, it should be as even-handed and truthful as possible. The council, and not the so-called ‘young professional’ demonised on the Facebook site, issued the gallery with a noise abatement order. This was after a number of complaints made by three different residents.

    Of course, noise is to be expected in the city centre, and it would be madness to complain about noise in, say, Wood Street. However, Roscoe Street (where the ‘young professional lives, and not Roscoe Lane, as stated in article) is a quiet side street away from the Ropewalks district, and in supposedly in the ‘Georgian Quarter’ (as the estate agents advertised it) some 100 metres away from Static. We did do research into the area, but unfortunately the gallery is not listed as a club or a bar. Residents and live music can live side by side happily, as long as the clubs/pubs/galleries have sufficient sound proofing — which Static gallery lacks.

    Static gallery undeniably makes an important contribution to the cultural life of Liverpool. But this ‘debate’ is really just calculated PR stunt aimed to marginalise the resident as a twerp, and generate the type of typical responses found below. Debate should be intelligent; this is not!

  • othersideofthestory

    PS The title of the debate on Facebook, ‘Urban Metropolis or Suburban Hinterland?’, does not present the issue as a real debate. The aim and bias of the debate are already implicit in the title, which more or less means ‘Really Exciting City or Really Boring City?’ (erm, wonder which side everyone is going take?!). This is far too black and white, and more nuance is needed here. Of course Liverpool shouldn’t be a suburban hinterland, and of course live music should be allowed, and of course the arts are important — especially in recessionary times. What about arguing for an urban metropolis, but one which lives harmoniously with its many neighbours? This is important, as Static gallery now finds itself next to a increasingly residential area…

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